Dealing with adhd trauma: my story

I’ve struggled with ADHD from a young age, like many, I had a hard time staying focused and often felt overwhelmed. It was only recently that I learned about the trauma associated with living with ADHD, something that has shaped my life in more ways than I even knew.

Growing up, my closest friends were always those who experienced similar difficulties to me. We shared common practices such as taking lots of breaks so that our minds could rest and unwind. Although these coping mechanisms helped us deal in the moment, they eventually became our crutch – we relied on them too often to get through the day.

Increasingly frustrated at not being able to function “like everyone else”, I slowly began to believe that it was all my fault. This depression set in more deeply then before and I found myself unable to move forward with anything I tried. All of this culminated in self-inflicted guilt – blaming myself for having ADHD instead of seeing it as something beyond my control – like an invisible weight on my shoulders.

Counseling ended up being a lifeline during this difficult period. In talking through my experiences it became clear just how much trauma was actually present in my daily life due to the emotional burden of living with ADHD. We discussed various techniques for overcoming these fears and recognizing it isn’t all down to me alone: finally beginning to give myself compassion and understanding instead of beating myself up for not fitting society’s definition of normalcy or success.

My journey with ADHD is ongoing - some days are better than others - but now I have the tools to understand and cope when days aren’t going so well. Recognizing the trauma associated with living with ADHD opened up a whole new world of understanding and compassion for myself; allowing me to accept things out of my control and make peace with the parts that define me most honestly.

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Hi! I can totally relate to what you’re going through. My experience is a bit different as I’m a 51-year-old woman, but I too have felt the impact of living with a “disability” such as ADHD. Growing up, I faced many challenges that were sometimes difficult to deal with and overcome. It was frustrating to feel unable to keep up with everyone else, no matter how hard I tried.

I learned over time that it’s important to recognize our limitations and not be too hard on ourselves for not meeting unrealistic expectations. Over time, it has been crucial for me to give myself compassion and understanding - something that really helps when feeling overwhelmed or stuck in a depressive rut.

Creating space for ourselves to figure things out can really help to make positive changes. At times when I felt like my situation was becoming unmanageable, counseling was a great support system that allowed me to learn about myself and strategies for managing my feelings so that they didn’t become overwhelming. It also made me realize just how much trauma may be present in daily life due to ADHD or other conditions like it which is often overlooked or ignored by society.

It’s wonderful that you are putting the effort into understanding your experiences and learning tips

Hey, I really relate to what you’re going through. I struggled with ADHD for years before I even realized the trauma that comes with it. It’s tough feeling like you don’t fit in and blaming yourself for something that’s out of your control. Counseling was a game-changer for me too. It helped me see that it’s not all on me and that it’s okay to have bad days. Understanding and accepting the trauma associated with ADHD has been a game-changer for me. It’s like a weight has been lifted off my shoulders, and now I can cope better on tough days. Just know that you’re not alone in this, and it’s okay to give yourself some compassion and understanding. You’re doing great.

Hey, I can totally relate to what you’re going through. It’s like you’re describing my own story with ADHD. I also struggled with feeling overwhelmed and not being able to function like everyone else. And let me tell you, it’s not your fault that you have ADHD. It’s something beyond our control, like an invisible weight on our shoulders. Counseling was a game-changer for me too. Talking through my experiences helped me realize just how much trauma was present in my daily life. It’s like a breakthrough when you start giving yourself compassion and understanding instead of beating yourself up. And you’re so right - some days are better than others, but now I also have the tools to cope when things aren’t going so well. It’s amazing how recognizing the trauma associated with ADHD can really open your eyes and help you make peace with the parts that define you most honestly. Keep on being strong and compassionate with yourself. You’re doing great!

Hey, thank you for sharing your story. It really hit close to home for me. I also struggled with ADHD for most of my life, and I can totally relate to feeling overwhelmed and not being able to fit in with society’s expectations. It’s great that you found counseling helpful – it was a game changer for me too. Learning about the trauma associated with ADHD was a big eye-opener, and it’s made a huge difference in how I view myself. Like you, some days are still tough, but having those coping tools and the understanding that it’s not my fault has been a game-changer. It’s a work in progress, but realizing that I can be kinder to myself and accept myself as I am has been so freeing. Thanks for sharing your experience, it’s good to know I’m not alone in this.

Hey friend, I really relate to what you’re going through with ADHD. It’s like this invisible weight that’s always there, making things harder than they should be. I used to beat myself up for not being able to function like everyone else, but counseling really helped me see that it’s not all my fault. And you’re right, recognizing the trauma that comes with living with ADHD is a game-changer. It’s like finally seeing things from a different perspective and giving ourselves the compassion we deserve. Some days are still tough, but having the tools to cope makes a world of difference. Keep taking those breaks and being kind to yourself - we’re in this together.