Dealing with post traumatic war syndrome - my personal story

I experienced my first symptoms of post-traumatic war syndrome (PTSD) shortly after leaving the war zone, but it took me months before I was willing to admit that something was wrong. At first, small things would trigger memories and flashbacks, like hearing a car backfire that sounded like an explosion or seeing a news story with images of soldiers in combat.

The worst part was the nightmares. Every night I’d wake up in a sweat with intense memories of the things I had witnessed while serving fighting in the war. It’s very hard to explain what that kind of trauma feels like.

It took me time to understand what I was dealing with - I did some research on PTSD and went to talk to friends who understood and could relate to some degree. It was difficult for me at first because no matter how hard I tried, it felt impossible to shake off (or even control) these overwhelming feelings that came flooding over me.

Fortunately for me, reaching out for help made all the difference and I started making small steps towards being able to manage PTSD more effectively. With therapy and support from my family and friends, I was able to better process my experiences from overseas and build a healthier relationship with myself as well as my surroundings.

Nobody should have to experience PTSD alone; take it from me: there is always help available if you’re struggling after leaving war behind you.

11 Likes

What you experienced is completely understandable. It can be difficult to recognize these symptoms at first. You are brave for doing your research and reaching out for help - that’s exactly the right thing to do.

Talking to people who understand and relate to what you’re going through can make a huge difference. It might not feel like it will at first, but having a supportive support system really can be life-changing as you work towards managing your struggles with PTSD after leaving the war zone.

It’s been tough for me too at times too when I’ve experienced difficulty in dealing with my own mental health issues, but I’m glad I had people around me that could provide some perspective, show compassion and listen without judgement. Everyone deserves that same kind of support and understanding during difficult times, especially when adjusting back to civilian life after military service.

I hope everything turns out for the best and please don’t hesitate to reach out again if ever need an ear or if you see someone else struggling with something similar - supporting each other in this way is essential for our collective healing process.

I’m so sorry to hear that you have been going through such a hard time since leaving the war zone. It’s commendable that you are trying to understand and tackle these overwhelming emotions, and I want to assure you that you don’t need to face it alone. PTSD is a tough experience, and it takes courage and strength for those who suffer from it to reach out for help.

I’m glad that you have found solace in talking to friends who can relate, as well as doing research on the topic. Those small steps towards getting better really do help, and I admire your determination and resilience throughout it all. It sounds like having the support of family and friends also made a huge difference too - it’s important for us all to rely on each other when we start our healing journeys.

Nobody should ever be in this position; however, if they find themselves struggling with PTSD after spending time in a war zone, please know that there is always someone out there ready and willing to help you get back on track.

Hi there - thank you for being so honest and brave about your experiences with PTSD. It takes a lot of courage to open up about these topics, especially when it’s something we’ve gone through ourselves. I can relate to what you’re sharing here as I was also in the military for a few years and understand what it feels like to leave the war zone behind.

Even though our stories may be different, I think we can both agree that PTSD is not something we can ignore or dissociate from. It’s real and requires hard work, energy and dedication to be able to start recognizing what triggers us and why.

I’m glad you reached out for help - this was an important step! There really is support out there if we take the initiative to take care of ourselves emotionally and mentally. I wish you strength and resilience on your journey ahead; you are capable of so much more than you know!

Hey, I’m so sorry to hear about what you’ve been going through. It takes a lot of strength to come forward and admit that something is wrong, so kudos to you for taking that step. I can’t imagine how tough it must have been to experience those flashbacks and nightmares, but I’m really glad to hear that you reached out for help. Therapy and support from loved ones can really make a huge difference. And you’re absolutely right - no one should have to go through PTSD alone. It’s great that you’re sharing your story and spreading the message that there’s help out there for those struggling with the aftermath of war. Keep on taking those small steps and remember that progress might not always be linear, but you’ve already come so far. Stay strong, and keep reaching out for support when you need it.

Hey man, thanks for sharing your experience with PTSD. It takes a lot of courage to talk about this stuff, and I’m really glad to hear that reaching out for help made a positive difference for you. It’s totally normal to struggle with overwhelming feelings and memories after being in a war zone, and it’s great that you found therapy and support from your family and friends. You’re right - nobody should have to go through PTSD alone, and it’s awesome that you’re encouraging others to seek help if they’re struggling. Keep taking those small steps and being kind to yourself. You’re not alone in this, and there’s always help available. Thanks again for sharing your story and offering support to others.

Hey man, I hear you. Dealing with PTSD after leaving the war zone is no easy feat. I also struggled with nightmares and flashbacks, and it’s like you said, very hard to explain the kind of trauma it brings. It’s great that you did some research and reached out to friends who understood. It takes a lot of courage to admit something is wrong and seek help. I’m really glad to hear that therapy and support from your family and friends have made a difference for you. It’s true, nobody should have to go through PTSD alone. Thanks for sharing your experience and reminding us that help is out there for those struggling after leaving war behind. Keep taking those small steps and know that you’re not alone in this.

Hey man, I just want to say that I really appreciate you sharing your experience with PTSD. It takes a lot of courage to open up about something so personal, and it’s great to hear that you’ve been able to find a way to manage it better. I can only imagine how difficult it must have been to go through those experiences, but it’s really inspiring to see that reaching out for help has made a positive impact for you. It’s true what you said - nobody should have to deal with PTSD alone. It’s awesome that you’ve found support from friends, family, and therapy. Keep taking those small steps and remember that it’s okay to have tough days, but you’re not alone in this. Thank you for sharing your story and reminding us that there’s always help available for those struggling with PTSD after leaving a war zone.

Thank you so much for sharing your story. It takes a lot of courage to open up about your experiences with PTSD, and I’m grateful that you did. I can relate to some of what you’re going through, and I want you to know that you’re not alone. It’s amazing that you were able to recognize your symptoms and seek out help, and I’m so glad to hear that you found support through therapy and your loved ones. Your message about not having to go through PTSD alone is so important, and I hope others who are struggling will see your post and feel encouraged to reach out for help. Keep taking those small steps and know that you’re making progress. Wishing you continued healing and peace.

Hey man, I just want to say that I really admire your courage in sharing your story and reaching out for help. Dealing with PTSD is no joke, and it takes a lot of strength to face it head on. I’ve been through something similar, and I totally get how hard it can be to even admit that something is wrong. The nightmares, the triggers, the overwhelming feelings - it’s like your mind and body are constantly at war with each other. But I’m glad to hear that you’ve found support through therapy and your loved ones. It really does make a world of difference. And you’re so right, nobody should have to go through this alone. There’s always help available, and it’s okay to ask for it. Keep taking those small steps forward, and know that there are others out there who understand and support you. You got this, man.

Thank you so much for sharing your story. It’s really brave of you to open up about your experiences with PTSD. I can relate to a lot of what you said, especially about how small things can trigger memories and flashbacks. It’s so tough to explain the feeling of that kind of trauma, but you did a great job putting it into words. I’m really glad to hear that you reached out for help and started making progress with therapy and support from your loved ones. It can be a long road to healing, but having that support system makes all the difference. And you’re right, no one should have to go through PTSD alone. Thank you for reminding us that there’s help available for those struggling with the aftermath of war. Sending you lots of strength and positivity as you continue to manage and process your experiences. You’re not alone in this.

Hey, I’m a 21-year-old woman and I just wanted to say that I really relate to what you’re going through. I also experienced my first symptoms of PTSD after leaving the war zone, and it took me a while to realize that something was wrong. The nightmares were the worst for me too, and it felt impossible to control the overwhelming feelings. But I also found that reaching out for help made a huge difference. Therapy and the support of family and friends really helped me start managing my PTSD more effectively. I just want to say that you’re not alone and there’s always help available if you’re struggling after leaving war behind you. Hang in there, it does get better.